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The Mystery of Man: How Together We Can Crack It

By October 15, 2013Uncategorized

By: Neil Rens.

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.” – Albert Einstein

Greetings! My name is Neil Rens and I am a new volunteer writer for The Transcript. I look forward to bringing you articles on interesting and exciting phenomena in the world of biotechnology. But first, a little bit about me…

Science has always piqued my interest, but an internship at The Scripps Translational Science Institute transformed my interest into passion. At the San Diego, CA lab where I was spending my summer, physicians and researchers were going on NASA space simulation flights to test digital medicine devices. Others were building genome annotation tools and still others were sequencing the “Wellderly” (healthy elderly) to discover what makes them tick. The intern experience was truly life-changing, and not just because my fellow interns and I earned our “Surfing Diplomas” after a day of lessons (although that certainly helped).

Arguably more important than the knowledge I learned or the skills I developed, the internship inspired me. I imagine most of you have had similar experiences that have shaped your dreams. For me, seeing firsthand the process of ideas being translated into medical advances was incredible. Did you know that you can get an ECG using just a special phone case? Or that blood pressure can be monitored in real time noninvasively? I hope to share my passion for digital and individualized medicine with you by reporting on the latest research and how it can be translated into real world patient gains.

Since you will be reading my articles (I hope!), it is important that you understand my perspective. Like you, I put a lot of stock in education; so much that I relocated across the country to get the best one possible. A sophomore studying biomedical engineering, I am a member of the Hopkins Tricorder X Prize Team and the Hopkins Medical Device Network. I also volunteer as a medic for the Hopkins Emergency Response Organization and work as a peer-led team learning facilitator through the PILOT program. An aspiring pianist, I am mesmerized by jazz and teach local Baltimore students how to play in my spare time.

That is me in a nutshell. If there are any topics you think merit an article in The Transcript or if you want to send me your reaction to one of my pieces, please feel free to shoot me an email at nrens1@jhu.edu. Scientific progress hinges on collaboration, so let’s have an open dialogue!

 

 

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